Nethy Bridge History

Comprehensive database with info and photos highlighting the fascinating history of Nethy and the surrounding area

Nethy Bridge History

Comprehensive database with info and photos highlighting the fascinating history of Nethy and the surrounding area

Nethy Bridge History

Comprehensive database with info and photos highlighting the fascinating history of Nethy and the surrounding area

Nethy Bridge History

Comprehensive database with info and photos highlighting the fascinating history of Nethy and the surrounding area

Nethy Bridge History

Comprehensive database with info and photos highlighting the fascinating history of Nethy and the surrounding area

Home » History » Old Kirk Graveyard

Old Kirk Graveyard

Owners/occupiers

The following were all ministers of the church

William Farquharson – 1580

Patrick Grant – 1585 to 1620s,

Colin Mackenzie – 1633

Roderick Mackenzie – 1642

John Sanderson – 1656

Colin Nicolson – 1670 Removed from post, but later restored.

James Grant -1686 Transferred to Abernethy 1686 from Urquhart. Minister there for three years. Brought before the Privy Council by the Laird Grant for refusing to accept the new King William or Queen Mary, or pray for them. Apparently had Jacobite sympathies. He was subsequently dismissed and had to leave the manse and glebe and deliver the church keys to the Laird. Died 1693.

No minister for several years.

William Grant – 1709 Appointed 1709. Apparently popular minister, remaining in post 40 years and twice avoiding transfer to Kingussie.

John Grant -1765 Died 1820. Served 55 years. Also known as Parson John, his portrait appears in Elizabeth Grants ‘Memoirs of a Highland Lady’. He was ‘a little merry man, fond of good eating, very fond of good drinking, no great hand at a sermon… For good practical sense, honesty of purpose, kindness of heart, tender feeling combined with energetic action, Parson John could hardly have been surpassed… He was all the more respected for the strictness of his discipline, yet a sly joke against the minister was much relished by his flock’.

1781 – Refused to admit Patrick McQueen and his wife to Communion on the grounds that Patrick was alleged to have committed perjury at a trial in Inverness. When Patrick challenged this in court, the Parson was upheld because he was judged not to be subject to a civil court in ecclesiastical matters. Patrick then sued him for libel. The case went to the Court of Session where the Lords decided that although it was a purely ecclesiastical matter, the Parson should not have discussed the matter publicly. Subsequently, he was found liable for damages and expenses.

Uses

Place of Worship

Built by

Heritors for the Church of Scotland

Construction date

Current building early 1770s (previous building 16th Cent).

Location/map ref

Nethy Bridge Community Centre

We are grateful to the listed businesses and organisations, without which it would not be possible to run a community website.

community.centre@nethybridge.com

A charitable company limited by guarantee
Registered charity number: SC 012389
Company registration number: SC 379387

Registered Office

Post Office
Nethy Bridge
Inverness-shire
PH25 3DA
Scotland